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Friday, 27 June 2014

Bengali Rasgulla by Garima Sarolia Narera (Guest Post)



Hello everyone, today I would take an opportunity to introduce you all with one of my close friend and food blogger Garima Sarolia Narera. I met her on CAL and really appreciate not only her cooking skills but also a wonderful writer cum poet in her. Apart from it she is a lovely women with full of enthusiasm and her bubbly nature makes her a perfect lady :)))). Recently she has started her new venture of blogging and I would like to congratulate and wish her success :)
She is also very well known as "Rasgulla queen" at CAL, so just thought and took this opportunity for a guest post of Rasgulla recipe. Rasgullas don't need any introduction but for my foreign country readers - Rasgulla is basically a Bengali dessert, its cheese based ball, soaked in sugar syrup and served chilled. So lets go for the recipe, Over to you Garima :)


I am delighted to be invited to Priyanka's wonderful blog. She is such a talented and vivacious person and I constantly enjoy trying out her recipes.
I am here with a recipe very close to my heart and one that I have perfected after several trials. It was also the first post on my blog :)

The sweet delight from the Bengal- rasgulla. A dessert which is everyone's delight and can be an occasional indulgence even for the health conscious. 



RASGULLA 
For the Rasgullas you need
1 Litre cow milk, cream removed (I buy the milk an evening prior, boil,cool and refrigerate. Next morning, remove the cream and proceed to make chenna/paneer)
1-2 Tablespoons Lemon Juice
To Make Chenna
(Here is a step wise guide to making paneer/chhena at home)
 Bring the milk to boil, add 1-2 tbsp lemon juice gradually so that the milk mass and whey separate completely.Add 10-15 ice cubes. Rest for a minute.
Strain in a colander lined with muslin/cheesecloth. Wash thoroughly with fresh water to remove the lemony sourness. Drain the water by squeezing. Knot the muslin cloth and hang it  to get rid for any excess whey/liquid.
After about 10-15 minutes, remove and rub the chenna with fingers and heels of the palm till the chenna gives out some fat/ ghee/chiknaayee. It takes me about 5 minutes to get there. By now the chenna is like a dough ball that comes together easily, neither too hard nor too soft.
Take pinches off the dough and make small balls, you should get about 15. Remember, they are going to double up on boiling so size them accordingly.
For the Sugar Syrup 
For the Light Sugar Syrup to boil the rasgullas
1 cup Sugar
5 cups Water
1/2 tsp fine cardamom (ilaichi) powder
For adding to the Light sugar syrup after boiling the rasgullas 
1/4 cup Sugar
1/2 cup Water
8-10 saffron strands (optional- I haven’t used here)
While you make the paneer balls, bring to boil 5 cups of water with a cup of sugar (light sugar syrup). Add half a tsp fine cardamom powder. Just as the syrup comes to a rolling boil, add in the rasgulla balls. Boil covered for 12- 15 minutes on medium flame.
I make my rasgullas in two batches so that the rasgullas get enough space in the water to expand and also keep their round shape.
You may uncover to check every 5 min minutes. Switch off the gas. Transfer gently to a big bowl full of clean drinking water. There should be enough water for the paneer balls to float freely.
Add one fourth cup sugar and half a cup of water to the same light sugar syrup in which the rasgullas were boiled  and give it a boil so that the sugar melts. Add in the saffron strands when the syrup becomes warm, do not add while it is hot.Let the sugar syrup cool to room temperature ( takes about 30 minutes)
Remove the rasgullas from the plain water, squeeze gently and drop into the sugar syrup.
Chill for three hours. You may top with some finely slivered pistachios and almonds.
 
Enjoy!
Garima

2 comments:

  1. " just changing the name from roshogolla to rasagulla won't make it Intellectual property of Oriyas.

    Rashogolla, like the most sweets in India will always and forever be a Bengali thing. Remember that Bengali households still are known for their amazing food culture and this fact is known world-wide :)

    tanSEN was bengali my dear friend, so were a lot of other people! want to see the entire list as it stands today? so was subash chandra bose and sri aurobindo :)

    and i can name a million others and i am proud to say our greateness can be exerted beyond our national borders.

    we are the fifth largest speakers!

    we bengalis have won pretty much every award in the world stage
    you name it we have it and we are damn proud of what we have :)

    its the only country in the world which took rebellion because it couldn't speak its mother tongue and it won! and won so hard that the UN had to adopt that day as the international language day, which celebrates languages from all over the world. "

    KAMONASISH AAYUSH MAZUMDAR
    MBA Aircel IMT Ghaziabad (2012 batch)
    Location: Bengaluru, Karnataka
    Home: Kolkata, WB
    in.linkedin.com/in/7thsense

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